The Joy of Fostering: Long Shot Lucy

Hope is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness. – Desmond Tutu The day that we met Long Shot Lucy, we actually came to the shelter to pull a different dog. My husband and I by that point had successfully fostered and adopted out about six dogs, and we were ready for a challenge. Lucy was not on our radar because she was considered a lost cause. The shelter did not think she would survive the stray hold at the shelter, and our vet would later agree that she was likely a matter of hours to days away from her organs shutting down from starvation. The is the scene we saw as we walked by her run:   It was hard to resist her sweet little face, and looking at her broke your heart. She was the most emaciated dog I had ever seen in the shelter. We decided to take her outside, and her condition was even more apparent in the sunlight: We debated for quite some time, but ultimately decided that we couldn’t leave her there, and she came home with us, with the hope of her being able to live a normal life. It was February, and we put a jacket on her to keep her warm. We researched online for best practices for dogs in her condition, and found that large endless meals can actually cause her harm, and so we began feeding her very small meals several times a day until we could get her to our vet on Monday. She was so excited for food that she...

Simple Dog Photo Tips

Why does watching a dog be a dog fill one with happiness? — Jonathan Safran Foer Dog photography is one of the most fun yet challenging endeavors one can take part in as a dog lover. While I wouldn’t call myself an expert or a professional, I’ve learned some tips and tricks along the way that may help you in your dog photography endeavors, regardless of whether you’re looking to just take some snapshots with your phone, or you’re trying to learn how to take more professional looking photos with your DSLR camera. Tip #1: Have Patience I list this one first because I think it is the most important. You can’t tell a dog to pose or smile, and even if the dog is trained well, their behavior is not always controllable or predictable. Sometimes you just need to set up the shot and wait. And wait. And wait. Sometimes they’ll never do anything photogenic no matter how hard you try or how long you wait and you may have to try again later. Other times they’ll suddenly do something cute, and if you play your cards right, you’ll already be lined up and ready to take the picture. Tip #2: Take Lots of Photos This goes along with tip #1. Because their behavior is not predictable, and more often than not they don’t understand the concept of posing, one of the best ways you can increase your odds of getting a great photo is by taking a ton of pictures. At an adoption event 3-4 hours long, I will often take 250-300 photos. My memory card can...

Is this thing on?

I will love the light for it shows me the way, yet I will endure the darkness because it shows me the stars. – Og Mandino Hello! I am very excited to get my portfolio and blog website up and running. It is something I’ve been wanting to do for quite some time. I hope to use this blog to share some of my thoughts about my professional work as well as my personal interests, especially in dog rescue. I hope that some of my posts can be useful for individuals in similar paths as myself. Please feel free to visit my contact page if you wish to contact me, for whatever reason! I’m always up for a discussion on whatever topics I have mentioned anywhere on this...